Sunday, November 14, 2010

Tackling Appendix N

I created this blog as a vehicle for posting regularly on my exploration of the suggested reading lists found in various role-playing game appendices. The title of this blog, Appendix N, refers to the Appendix, in the back of the original 1979 Advanced Dungeons and Dragons Dungeon Masters Guide, bearing the same title. On a weekly basis, I intend to post a review of a book, movie or graphic novel that I find inspirational for designing and running a Dungeons and Dragons campaign. Since my tastes are varied and my concentration notoriously unreliable, i'm not going to commit to a particular schedule, other than trying to blog once per week, but at present i'm going to first try to tackle at least one book from each of the following authors, before I branch out to other writers and mediums.


• Anderson, Poul

• Anthony, Piers

• de Camp, L. Sprague & Pratt, Fletcher

• Haggard, H. Rider

• Howard, Robert E.

• Lanier, Sterling

• Leiber, Fritz

• Merritt, A.

• Moorcock, Michael

• Saberhagen, Fred

• Vance, Jack

• Zelazny, Roger

7 comments:

  1. Hi Paladin: I've been meaning to ask you if you have ever written your own fiction?

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  2. Nope. My writing style is far too technical and minimalist for fiction.

    Perhaps i'd make a good instruction-manual writer though!

    :D

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  3. You in fact would make a fantastic instructional writer. Though, I still think you'd fair quit well in fiction.

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  4. How's the snow? We're getting another round this week. But really, we've been lucky to have the nice fall. Snow only started for real, last week, here. Late.

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  5. Just a dusting yesterday. Today and tomorrow we're getting a chinook, so the snow should be melting.

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  6. Blast of warm pacific air tumbling over the rockies. Calgary is in the perfect geographic location, so that as the air comes over the mountains, it drops down on the city, usually raising the temperature by 20-30 degrees within an hour or so. We get them several times during winter. I'll have to post a picture of a "chinook arch" which is aatmospheric phenomenon that accompanies the chinook.

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